Australia May Introduce Its Own Electronics Ban

May 16, 2017

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Australia might soon follow in the footsteps of the United States and the United Kingdom by implementing its own electronics ban. Yesterday, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told ABC News that the nation is “looking at it [the electronics ban] very closely.” He added that it’s “taking into account all of the information and advice [it’s] receiving internationally and [it’s] working very closely with [its] partners. In due course, any announcements will be made formally though the Transport Minister.”

In March, the US banned travelers from carrying on large electronics on nonstop flights from 10 Middle Eastern and African airports to the US. The UK implemented a similar rule shortly after and now the US is considering expanding the moratorium to US-bound flights departing from Europe.

It’s unclear how the ban would be implemented in Australia and which routes would be affected. However, an Aussie electronics ban would likely first be applied on flights from the Middle East, which would affect flights on Emirates, Etihad, Qantas and Qatar Airways. If the ban were to be implemented, it would surely have an impact on any travelers that have chosen (or will choose) to fly through the well-positioned hubs maintained by the ‘ME3.’

H/T: ABC News

Featured image courtesy of Mark Dadswell via Getty Images. 

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