The 5 Craziest Things Passengers Tried to Sneak by the TSA in October

Oct 31, 2017

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Another month, another list of crazy things passengers tried to sneak by TSA when traveling. The TSA’s Instagram includes cheeky posts about all things people attempt to take with them on their flights, either by carrying on or checking it in their bags, that are obviously not-TSA-approved items. At least some of the ones we’ve rounded up for you were trying to get in the Halloween spirit. All in all, it’s just another month of confiscated deadly weapons and explosives at US airports.

1. Loaded Firearm…Hidden in a Wheelchair Cushion

Well, that’s one way to attempt to sneak in a loaded gun. I’ve heard of people sneaking in mini bottles of alcohol into football stadiums via wheelchair cushions. But guns through airport security? That’s a bold one. Next time, just follow regulations and properly check your (unloaded) gun.

This loaded firearm was discovered concealed inside a traveler’s wheelchair cushion at the McGhee Tyson Airport (TYS) in Tennessee. … While firearms are prohibited in carry-on bags, you can pack them in your checked baggage as long as you meet the packing guidelines: bit.ly/travelingwithfirearms … As a refresher, carry-on bags go into the cabin of the plane with you. Checked bags go into the cargo hold of the plane where passengers have no access. … When firearms are discovered at the checkpoint, we contact law enforcement and they decide what happens based on background checks, interviews and local laws. … A firearm at the checkpoint could lead to fines, arrests, missed flights or all of the above. As far as what happens to confiscated firearms, that’s up to each local police department.

A post shared by TSA (@tsa) on

2. Spooky Spider Knife

We’ll give this person the benefit of the doubt and say they were channeling Halloween when they thought it’d be permissible to bring a knife through security. Or maybe it was a part of his/her costume and that’s why they checked in on their carry on. Either way, packing a knife is only allowed in checked luggage that follows certain guidelines.

3. Inert Prototype Projectiles 

While these are just prototypes, I can assure you that If I saw these on an airplane I would sound a few alarms. The United Nations defines an ‘inert projectile’ as “cartridges for weapons…ammunition consisting of a cartridge case fitted with a centre or rimfire primer and containing both a propelling charge and solid projectile(s).” This definition alone scares me enough into fully supporting the TSA’s decision to not allow these on aircraft.

4. Brush and Comb Daggers

I’m all about traveling stylishly, but I value safety even more so; I commend these TSA agents for discerning between style and safety. I wonder what it looked like when it was getting scanned in security — a lethal comb or a knife with bristles? Hopefully these agents didn’t give these brushes back to their rightful owner, and hopefully their rightful owner was using them for style and not safety.

5. Gunpowder and Fuse

You have to wonder what someone is thinking when he or she packs a pound of gunpowder and a fuse (separately, at least), and checks that bag. Maybe the owner mistook the canister and cord for their protein powder and phone charger? I can only hope they were going to use it recreationally, whatever that might entail.

Feature image by Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

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