The 5 Craziest Things Passengers Tried to Sneak by the TSA in November

Dec 2, 2017

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It’s always a joy to see just what the TSA confiscated every month. Will it be another weapon? A live animal? All of the above? Most likely, since passengers have no shame when trying to sneak things by security agents at airports. November was no different with TSA’s Instagram filled with the hilarious — and sometimes scary — items passengers tried to bring on their flights. From delicious treats to dangerous weapons, check out the five best things found on the TSA Instagram for November.

1. Pie in the Sky

Couldn’t get enough of grandma’s pie and wanted to bring some home for later? Don’t fret, the pie can fly. Of course, it has to go through security screening like everything else, but if it’s just a saccharine sweet filled with goodness (and no hidden secrets), it should be good to go.

2. A Pint-Sized Revolver

When is everyone going to learn that a firearm of any type is never allowed on an aircraft in a carry-on; it’s allowed only if it’s securely checked and placed in the cargo of the plane where passengers can’t access their luggage. As adorable and petite as this loaded gun was, it’s still a no-go in carry-on baggage. Firearms discovered at security can result in fines, arrest and missed flights or any combination of the aforementioned. A word to the wise: Check your guns and you won’t get featured on TSA’s Instagram account.

This pint-sized revolver was discovered in a carry-on bag at the Cincinnati Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG). … While firearms are prohibited in carry-on bags, you can pack them in your checked baggage as long as you meet the packing guidelines: bit.ly/travelingwithfirearms … As a refresher, carry-on bags go into the cabin of the plane with you. Checked bags go into the cargo hold of the plane where passengers have no access. … When firearms are discovered at the checkpoint, we contact law enforcement and they decide what happens based on background checks, interviews and local laws. … A firearm at the checkpoint could lead to fines, arrests, missed flights or all of the above. As far as what happens to confiscated firearms, that’s up to each local police department.

A post shared by TSA (@tsa) on

3. Don’t “Ruffle” Any Feathers with Knives

The only thing more suspicious than carrying an unapproved TSA item in your carry-on is hiding it in something like a bag of chips. This passenger who was flying out of St. Croix (STX) tried to sneak a knife past security in his carry-on … all he had to do was throw the knife (and chips) in his checked luggage and fly away from his Virgin Island departure with no qualms.

4. #TBT to TSA’s Coolest Passengers

In addition to staying cool, penguins Penny and Pete are the cutest passengers to go through security at San Antonio International Airport (SAT). All travelers should take a cue from this pair and play it cool as a cucumber when going through security screening. The flightless birds fully complied with TSA guidelines and emptied their pockets and took out their laptops before waddling through security. Penny and Pete, you two are our TSA saviors.

5. You “Cane” Not Bring That Through Security

This passenger at Chattanooga Airport (CHA) failed on two counts: You can’t carry on replica bullets or concealed weapons like swords hidden within canes. While the fake bullet had nothing concealed in it, it’s still enough to set off alarms for security when going through the X-ray. Of course, a sword hidden in a cane is a big “no-no” since it’s a dangerous weapon. However, both items are allowed in checked luggage. Unfortunately, this guy found out the hard way — we’re really hoping the cane wasn’t doubling as an actual cane to help him walk.

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