All 64 countries, territories and regions that are on the UK’s travel corridor list

Jan 15, 2021

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Editor’s note: On Friday 15 January, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that the U.K. will close all travel corridors as of 4 a.m. on 18 January. At that time, all travellers arriving in the U.K. from abroad will be required to self-isolate for 10 days, regardless of where they came from. Additionally, as of that date, all travellers arriving in the U.K. from abroad will be required to have a negative COVID-19 test result prior to boarding their flight. You can find more details here.


In early July, the U.K. government unveiled two lists with relation to travel. Firstly, the government unveiled its list of countries wherein arrivals to England would not have to quarantine for 14 days. And secondly, the government unveiled its list of countries that the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) deemed were safe for non-essential travel.

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While there are some discrepancies on the two lists — some countries are deemed unsafe by the FCDO but don’t have to quarantine on arrival in England, and vice versa — the sweet spot lies wherein a country is shown on both lists.

However, as we’ve learned over the past few weeks, those lists could change at any moment. The most recent example of that includes removing Chile, Madeira, the Azores, Aruba, Qatar and Bonaire, St Eustatius and Saba from the list. The move came the same day the government announced that it would ban all international arrivals from South America and Portugal.

The government has also introduced its “regional travel corridors” approach, which allows it to evaluate more localised locations.

If anything, the announcements have been a reminder that the government has said that it could change its advice for travel at any moment.

Since 6 January, travel for non-essential reasons is illegal, as England has entered its third national lockdown. Until lockdown is lifted in mid-February, Britons can’t travel for non-essential reasons. These travel corridors apply to those who have to travel for essential reasons or those who are already abroad, looking to return home to England.

As of Saturday, 16 January at 4 a.m., there are 64 countries, regions or territories on England — and the rest of the U.K.’s — travel corridor list. In other words, if you’re arriving in the U.K. from any of the 64 countries, territories or regions on the list, you do not need to self-isolate for 10 days. However, if you’re arriving in the U.K. from a country not on the list — such as from Spain, Italy or the United States, among others — you will have to self-isolate for 10 days.

Related: UK reduces quarantine period to 10 days

As of 15 December 2020, England implemented its Test to Release programme. With it, travellers coming from non-travel corridor countries can elect to pay for and take a COVID-19 test on their fifth day of quarantine. If the test returns a negative result, they can forgo the remainder of their quarantine.

Finally, as of 18 January at 4 a.m., all travellers entering England from abroad — regardless of where they’re coming from or if they’re British citizens — will have to have a negative COVID-19 test. The test must be taken no more than 72 hours prior to departure.

It’s also worth noting that just because a destination is on England’s travel corridor list doesn’t mean that Brits will actually be allowed in. Australia, for example, appears on the list, however, Australia’s borders are closed to non-citizens, residents and family members.

Keep in mind that the following countries may not also appear on the FCDO’s list of countries.

Related: What happens if you ignore government advice to travel right now?

Here are the 64 countries and territories you can travel to without having to isolate on your return to England as of 4 a.m. on 16 January.

(Note that while Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have their own travel corridors list, as of this time, they match up to that of England’s.)

In This Post

Africa

  • Rwanda
  • St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha

Americas and Caribbean

  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Barbados
  • Bermuda
  • British Antarctic Territory
  • British Virgin Islands
  • Cayman Islands
  • Cuba
  • Dominica
  • Falkland Islands
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Montserrat
  • South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
  • St Barthélemy
  • St Kitts and Nevis
  • St Lucia
  • St Pierre and Miquelon
  • St Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Turks & Caicos

Asia

  • Bahrain
  • Bhutan
  • British Indian Ocean Territory
  • Brunei
  • Cambodia
  • Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • Laos
  • Macao
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Mongolia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Sri Lanka
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • Timor-Leste
  • Vietnam

Australia and Pacific Islands

  • Australia
  • Fiji
  • Kiribati
  • Micronesia
  • New Caledonia
  • New Zealand
  • Pitcairn, Henderson, Ducie and Oeno Islands
  • Samoa
  • Solomon Islands
  • The Northern Mariana Islands
  • Tonga
  • Vanuatu

Europe

  • Akrotiri and Dhekelia
  • Channel Islands
  • Faroe Islands
  • Finland
  • Gibraltar
  • Greek Islands (ONLY the following islands: Corfu, Crete, Rhodes, Zakynthos and Kos)
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Isle of Man
  • Norway

Editor’s note: On Friday 15 January, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that the U.K. will close all travel corridors as of 4 a.m. on 18 January. At that time, all travellers arriving in the U.K. from abroad will be required to self-isolate for 10 days, regardless of where they came from. Additionally, as of that date, all travellers arriving in the U.K. from abroad will be required to have a negative COVID-19 test result prior to boarding their flight. You can find more details here.

Featured photo by Anton Petrus/Getty Images.

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