Which Caribbean countries can I travel to from England right now?

Sep 29, 2020

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Editor’s note: This story has been updated with new information.

As the travel industry reopens following COVID-19 shutdowns, TPG suggests that you talk to your doctor, follow health officials’ guidance and research local travel restrictions before booking that next trip. We will be here to help you prepare, whether it is next month or next year.

Could there be a better place to escape the nightmare that is 2020 than the mesmerising turquoise waters and white sandy beaches of the Caribbean? We don’t think so either.

In a world of quarantines, travel advisories and outright travel bans, it can be hard to know where you stand on visiting certain countries. We put this guide together to cut through the noise and make it easier and clearer to understand whether or not you, as a U.K. passport holder travelling from England, are permitted to travel to the following Caribbean destinations — and whether or not there are flights operating to get you there.

Related: All 14 countries and territories you can visit from England without quarantine on either end

First, it should be made clear that where we say it is permitted to travel to a certain country because it features on the travel corridor list (i.e. no quarantine on return to England), it also means that the country features on the FCO’s list of countries that are deemed safe to travel to.

Also keep in mind that this list applies to countries that appear on England’s travel corridors list. The countries that appear on the lists of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland may differ.

We’ll keep this post updated as and when regulations change. Most recently, Barbados revised its stance on travellers coming from the U.K., rendering it a high-risk country. Now, travellers entering the island nation have to provide a negative COVID-19 test result and quarantine for up to seven days. Let’s dive in.

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In This Post

Anguilla

Anguilla is on England’s travel corridor list, meaning travel there is permitted without quarantine on return to England, however, it’s not on the FCO’s list. Therefore, the FCO still advises against all non-essential travel to Anguilla. Additionally, strict regulations to get into Anguilla are in force until at least 31 October, meaning that all travel to Anguilla must be pre-approved before arrival. Showing a negative test three to five days before arrival will be required if you get authorisation to travel, and 10 to 14 days of quarantine is mandatory. It’s probably worth rethinking Anguilla, at least for now.

Antigua and Barbuda

Antigua and Barbuda is on England’s travel corridor and FCO list, meaning travel there is permitted. However, there’s a possibility that on arrival you may be instructed by local authorities to quarantine, for which there would also be a fee of 100 Eastern Caribbean Dollars (£28) per night. For further information, click here.

If you’d like to take your chances and visit anyway, Virgin Atlantic is restarting its flights to the islands as of 29 October. The cheapest return fare we’re seeing is around £392 from London.

Related: Virgin Atlantic releases plans to restart more routes this winter

Nothing says holiday like paddleboarding across the turquoise sea to get to an Ocean Bar in Antigua (Photo by Roberto Moiola/Sysaworld via Getty)
Nothing says holiday like paddleboarding across the turquoise sea to get to an Ocean Bar in Antigua. (Photo by Roberto Moiola/Sysaworld/Getty)

Aruba

Aruba does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

The Bahamas

The Bahamas does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the islands.

Barbados

Barbados is on England’s travel corridor list and on the FCO’s list, meaning travel there is permitted without quarantine on return to England. However, from 1 October, U.K. arrivals are considered high-risk and will have to quarantine in their accommodation for up to seven days while waiting for the result of a second PCR test. A first test must be taken prior to arrival, with a negative result taken within 72 hours of arrival. If the second test, taken after arrival, returns a negative result, the traveller will be allowed to leave quarantine.

BA is operating three flights per week for the rest of September, before increasing to five the week of 5 October and then daily from 12 October.

Meanwhile, Virgin plans to reinstate flights to Barbados with up to three flights per week from Manchester and five times per week from London. You can read more about the schedule here.

Belize

Belize does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel.

Bermuda

Bermuda appears on both the FCO’s safe list, as well as on England’s travel corridor list, meaning you can travel without quarantine on return. Travellers arriving on the island must bring with them proof of a negative COVID-19 test and will be further tested on arrival at the airport. Travellers must remain in quarantine in their accommodation until the results of the airport test are revealed. Failure to do so could result in as much as a $25,000 fine or even six months in prison.

Bermuda (Photo by Cavan Images/Getty)
(Photo by Cavan Images/Getty)

British Virgin Islands

The British Virgin Islands is on England’s travel corridor list, however, it’s not on the FCO’s safe list. Additionally, entry is prohibited with only a few exceptions including return Virgin Islanders, work permit holders and other specified groups. A strict 14-day quarantine will be mandatory along with a fee of £1,948 per person for accommodation, 24-hour security and meals. Definitely not one for the holiday list for the time being.

Cayman Islands

The Cayman Islands is on England’s travel corridor list and the FCO’s safe list, meaning travelling there is permitted. Those wishing to travel must have pre-authorisation and will be subject to a mandatory 14-day quarantine in a government facility on arrival.

Cuba

Cuba is on England’s travel corridor list, as well as FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. Visitors may only enter on charter flights to the following resorts: Cayo Coco, Cayo Cruz and Cayo Guillermo via Cayo Coco (CCC), Cayo Santa Maria via Santa Clara (SNU) or Cayo Largo del Sur (CYO).

Related: 7 little-known Caribbean destinations you should discover — before others do

Unfortunately for us Brits, there are currently no direct charter flights to those airports so that unbelievably turquoise sea and dreamy white sand remains off limits for now.

The whitest of sand and most turquoise of sea at Cayo Coco, Cuba (Photo by Vitaldrum/Getty)
The whitest of sand and most turquoise sea at Cayo Coco, Cuba. (Photo by Vitaldrum/Getty Images)

Curaçao

As of 26 September, Curaçao no longer features on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

Dominica

Dominica is on England’s travel corridor list and the FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. The island’s borders are open to tourists, though with a couple of caveats. Prior to arrival, travellers must fill out an online questionnaire and have proof of a negative test taken up to 72 hours before arrival. A five-day quarantine will still be imposed even if your pre-departure and Rapid Diagnostic Test on arrival are both negative.

Dominican Republic

The Dominican Republic does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

Grenada

Grenada is on England’s travel corridor list as well as the FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. However, according to local government regulations on the island, countries with more than 60 cases per 100,000 are deemed “high risk” and are so-called red-zone countries. As the number of cases per 100,000 is currently above that in the U.K., travellers would be required to quarantine on arrival.

There are currently no direct flights from the U.K. to Grenada. An alternative is flying to Barbados (BGI) with either BA or Virgin and connecting onto a local inter-island service to Grenada (GND).

Related: All 66 countries, territories and regions that are on the UK’s travel corridor list

Guadeloupe

Guadeloupe does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

Haiti

Haiti does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

Jamaica

Jamaica does not feature on England’s travel corridor list and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

Martinique

The FCO deems travel to the island of Martinique to be safe, but the little piece of French paradise is not on England’s travel corridor list, which means quarantine upon arrival back into England is still required.

If you are set on visiting, then your best option would be to fly with Air France via Paris, as there are no nonstop flights from the U.K. The cheapest fares start at around £421 return.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the island.

St Barts

St Barts is on England’s travel corridor list and on the FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. However, if you’re planning on visiting, you will be required to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival.

St Kitts and Nevis

St Kitts and Nevis is on England’s travel corridor list and on the FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. However, its borders are currently closed to all non-citizens and non-residents until October.

St Lucia

St Lucia is on England’s travel corridor list and on the FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. However, U.K. arrivals will be required to quarantine for 14 days in a government operated quarantine facility or a COVID-19 certified property. Visitors must stay in a COVID-certified property for the duration of their stay.

Gros Piton - the famous volcanic peak in St Lucia (Photo by Pawel Toczynski/Getty)
Gros Piton – the famous volcanic peak in St Lucia. (Photo by Pawel Toczynski/Getty)

St Maarten

Similar to Martinique, the U.K. government is not currently advising against travel to St Maarten, however, on returning to England, you would need to quarantine as the island does not feature on the travel corridor list. To get into the country, you must have completed a self health declaration form online 72 hours prior to arrival and have a negative PCR test no older than 72 hours prior to arrival.

St Vincent and the Grenadines

St Vincent and the Grenadines is on England’s travel corridor list and on the FCO’s safe list, meaning travel there is permitted. Once there, however, visitors from the U.K. will be required to quarantine for between 48 to 72 hours at home or in a government-approved hotel to await clearance following a test on arrival at the airport.

Trinidad and Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the islands.

Turks and Caicos

Turks and Caicos does not feature on England’s travel corridor list, and the FCO advises against travel to the islands.

Bottom line

It can be all too easy to get carried away and get caught up in dreams of escaping to a tropical paradise. However, given the nature of our world right now, it’s advisable to do a couple of extra checks. Make your planning more thorough to ensure you don’t get caught up in any COVID-19-induced regulations that could turn a dream trip into a nightmare.

Featured photo by Matt Anderson Photography/Getty

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