Is a Wizz Air Discount Club membership worth it?

Dec 13, 2019

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When thinking about airline frequent flyer loyalty programmes, the first things that comes to mind are those that belong to legacy carriers like British Airways’ Executive Club and Virgin Atlantic’s Flying Club. However, some low-cost airlines like EasyJet and Wizz Air have their own version by way of paid membership programmes. The benefits are different and far less spoken about — but that doesn’t mean to say that they shouldn’t be considered.

Enter Wizz Air’s “Discount Club”.

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How much does it cost?

While the majority of frequent flyer programmes are free to join, this is often not the case for low-cost airlines’ membership programmes. To be a member of Wizz Air’s Discount Club, the airline charges an annual fee of 39.99 euro (~£33) for a Standard Membership and 79.99 euro (~£67) for a Group Membership.

(Image courtesy Wizz Air)

What do I get?

It probably won’t come as a shock that saving money is the main perk of an airline loyalty programme called “Discount Club”. For each flight you take with Wizz Air, you will save 10 euro — that’s 20 euro in savings per return trip. Members are also eligible for a 5 euro discount on checked bags purchased online every time they fly.

The flight and luggage discounts are also applicable to one companion for the cheaper 39.99 euro membership and up to five for the more expensive 79.99 euro group membership.

It’s worth noting that companions must be travelling on the same booking as the Discount Club member to be eligible for the same discounts. For both the Discount Club member and their companion, the 10 euro discount is only eligible on flights that cost more than 19.99 euro.

Read more: Comparing Europe’s top 4 low-cost carriers: Ryanair, EasyJet, Jet2 and Wizz Air

Is it worth it?

If you fly as a solo passenger and make at least two return trips (without baggage) with Wizz Air per year, then you will already have paid for your membership. This number  drops to just one trip if you travel with a companion. If you travel more than that, you start to really save some money — especially when you add baggage to your trips.

If you’re flying to a European destination that isn’t a capital city or a big destination city, then the chances of being able to use other, legacy airline reward programmes to fly direct is probably quite slim. The best thing to do is check to see if Wizz Air flies to your future travel destinations to see if it’s worth your while in getting a Discount Club membership in order to save money.

Wizz Air’s main U.K. hub is London Luton (LTN). Routes are mainly to eastern Europe, but you can also get to popular tourist destinations like Porto (OPO), Reykjavik, Iceland (KEF) and Larnaca, Cyprus (LCA). If you want something a little more adventurous, the airline announced a new route to St Petersburg, Russia (LED).

(Photo courtesy Wizz Air)

It’s not just Londoners and those living in the south who might benefit from the Discount Club. Wizz Air also has flights to multiple destinations from airports across the U.K., including Aberdeen (ABZ), Birmingham (BHX), Doncaster/Sheffield (DSA) and Edinburgh (EDI).

Bottom line

Joining Wizz Air’s Discount Club might not be worth it for everyone. It comes down to planning your travel over the course of a year and seeing whether you think that you will fly Wizz Air enough to make it count. Considering that the membership could pay for itself pretty quickly, it might be more valuable to you than at first thought.

Featured image by Omar Marques/Getty Images

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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