A New Observation Deck in Denmark Gives Visitors Stunning Treetop Views

Apr 10, 2019

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Denmark’s Camp Forest Adventure Park in Gisselfield Castle Forest just opened a new observation deck to the public.

Sitting at a hulking 135 feet tall, the tower has a striking, spiral-shaped appearance and is made up of weathered steel, locally sourced wooden slats and glass. According to Arup, this is to help the building “blend in” to its forest surroundings. It’s appearance also offers visitors a more one-with-nature feel as they make their way up the coiled, 710-foot pathway to the top deck.

The 45-meter-high observation tower of the Camp Adventure, designed by EFFECT Architects, is pictured as it is under construction at Gisselfeld Kloster near Haslev on Zealand in Denmark, on October 15, 2018. (Photo by MADS CLAUS RASMUSSEN/AFP/Getty Images)
The 45-meter-high observation tower of the Camp Adventure, designed by EFFECT Architects, is pictured as it is under construction at Gisselfeld Kloster near Haslev on Zealand in Denmark, on October 15, 2018. (Photo by MADS CLAUS RASMUSSEN/AFP/Getty Images)

The new tower, called the “Camp Adventures Forest Tower” since it’s located in the middle of Camp Forest Adventure Park, was recently opened to the public in late March after five years of construction. It’s about an hour drive south of Copenhagen, and the walk to the top itself takes about 15 minutes if you don’t stop for breaks.

Visitors who make the climb all the way to the top deck will be treated to a vista that stretches over the treetops of the Gisselfield Castle Forest.

“The whole idea is to bring lots of people into the forest for a completely unique forest walk,” said architect Tue Hesselberg Foged to Euro News. “It’s kind of a vertical forest path that takes you from the forest bed, through the tree trunks and up where the wind is blowing in your hair and you feel vertigo and you can see all over the countryside.”

Gary Hamilton, a visitor from Ireland, contended with the vertigo-adjacent feeling one could get at the top of the tower. “I thought it was fantastic,” he said. “It is kind of disorienting, going all the way up to the top, but it’s nice how you can touch the trees in the middle.”

Photos by TARIQ MIKKEL KHAN/AFP/Getty Images.

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