Your Vacation to Croatia Will Soon Get More Expensive

Aug 3, 2018

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Just in time for your next vacation, Croatia, one of the world’s trendiest destinations, is increasing the amount in taxes you’ll have to pay in order to visit it by 25%.

In an effort to dull the pains of its exponentially growing tourism industry, Croatia is increasing the price of its tourist tax from 8 kuna ($1.25) per night to 10 kuna ($1.56) per night. The change takes effect as of January 1, 2019, and will apply to accommodations during the peak season, with the exception of campsites.

Gari Cappelli, Croatia’s tourism minister and president of its tourist board, said the money earned from the increased tourist tax will be given to the Red Cross, the tourist board and destinations in the country.

“I am sure that all our dear guests would gladly contribute to the beauty, infrastructure, offer and promotion of destinations in the Republic of Croatia,” Cappelli said.

While the 2 kuna ($0.31) increase might not seem like much, it could add up to be a somewhat noticeable addition to the cost of a vacation. For a seven-night stay, tourists will pay a total of 70 kuna ($10.95), as compared to the old rate, which would have cost 56 kuna ($8.76).

Croatia isn’t the first destination that’s increased the cost of its tourist tax. In June, New Zealand announced it’d be increasing its tourist tax from 25 NZD to 35 NZD ($17 to $24).

Featured image by Samantha T. Photography / Getty Images.

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