Your Instagram will thank you: One of Tokyo’s most famous art installations is coming to London

Feb 25, 2020

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

If you know anyone who has been to Japan recently, you’re likely to have seen pictures on their Instagram in one of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Rooms. If you haven’t seen a pic yet, they usually look a little something like this:

Infinity Mirrored Room – Filled with the Brilliance of Life, Kusama's largest Infinity Mirror Room to date. Tate Modern, London, UK. Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese artist. Throughout her career she has worked in a wide variety of media, including painting, collage, sculpture, performance art and environmental installations, most of which exhibit her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition and pattern. (Photo by In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images)
Infinity Mirrored Room – Filled with the Brilliance of Life, Kusama’s largest Infinity Mirror Room to date (Photo by In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images)

If flying to Japan in the name of the ‘Gram seems a bit extreme, then you’ll be able to fulfil your social media needs just by jumping on the Tube very soon. As part of Tate Modern’s 20th Anniversary celebrations, the art gallery will be featuring two of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Room installations.

The globally renowned 90-year-old’s “Infinity Mirrored Room – Filled With the Brilliance of Life”  and “Chandelier of Grief” will open to visitors on 11 May 2020 for an entire year, closing up again on 9 May 2021. Tickets will go on sale 2 March — Tate Modern members will get free access while those without will be charged a small fee, which has not yet been disclosed. Memberships cost from £78 per year or £7.50 per month.

In the last five years, more than five million people have visited Kusama’s exhibitions in Tokyo. When speaking about Kusama’s work and that of other new installations this year, Frances Morris, director of the Tate Modern, said that the artists “embody art’s journey from the avant-garde of the early 20th century to the immersive installations being created today”.

Head over to the Tate Modern website to find out more.

Featured image by In Pictures Ltd./Corbis via Getty Images

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.