Own a Piece of AvGeek History: John Glenn’s Helmet Is up for Auction

May 30, 2018

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Holding several superlatives in the field of travel, John Glenn is an icon to AvGeeks worldwide. Today, the helmet he wore from his famous transcontinental “Project Bullet” flight back in 1957 is going up for auction. The starting price? A casual $100,000.

Project Bullet was the nickname Glenn gave to his historic flight when he became the first pilot to make a supersonic transcontinental flight from Los Alamitos Naval Air Station in California to Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn, New York. He broke speed records of his time and traveled faster than (you guessed it) a bullet, arriving in New York in under 3.5 hours, in a Vought F8U Crusader fighter jet.

One the side of the helmet lies his name “J.H. Glenn” in gold font.

Besides his historic Project Bullet flight, the late Glenn also was a US senator, the oldest person to fly in space at age 77 and the first American to ever orbit the Earth – in fact, he orbited the Earth three times in that mission. 

Although one-of-a-kind, TPG can’t help add this piece of aviation history as an honorable mention to our Father’s Day gift ideas. Besides, isn’t your travel-savvy dad worth the big bucks?

The helmet hits the auction block Thursday. It will be put under the gavel by Nate D. Sanders Auctions.

H/T: AP

Featured image by Getty Images.

Editorial Disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

Disclaimer: The responses below are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.