Qantas Is Slowly Ending 747 Service to the US

Apr 24, 2018

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Travelers heading to Australia from the continental US will have fewer options if their goal is to fly a 747 across the Pacific. We now have more details about when Qantas will end its 747 service on some routes from Australia to the US.

On December 3, 2018, the Australian flag carrier will replace the aging 747 with a combination of flights on its Airbus A380 and Boeing 787. The Tuesday flight from Sydney (SYD) to Los Angeles (LAX) (QF11/12), currently served by a 747, will be replaced with an A380. Now, the Airbus superjumbo will fly daily from both Melbourne (MEL) and Sydney.

Qantas operates twice daily seasonal service from Sydney to Los Angeles (usually it’s just one flight a day) — that flight will also be operated by an A380 instead of a 747.

There’s still hope for those who want to fly on a 747 from the US. Qantas will be swapping its A330-300 for a 747 on its Sydney (SYD) – Honolulu (HNL) route from December 7 through April 21, 2019. This adds increased capacity on the route and Qantas’ 747 is outfitted with its premium economy product.

Starting on December 17, Qantas will add another weekly flight from Sydney (SYD) to San Francisco (SFO) making the route served every day of the week. The 747 will continue to fly on this route.

Qantas is cutting back service on one of its longest routes — the 15.5/17.5 hour flight between Sydney (SYD) and Dallas (DFW).  We’ll see a reduction from seven to six flights per week on its A380.

We’ve already known that on September 1, Qantas will replace the 747-400 on the Brisbane (BNE) – Los Angeles – New York (JFK) with its new 787-9 Dreamliner. The 787 will also fly four times weekly between Melbourne (MEL) and San Francisco (SFO).

Qantas 787 business class.

Featured image by Chris Putnam / Barcroft Media via Getty Images.

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